Pelvic Pain Syndrome Menu

What is pelvic pain syndrome?

Pelvic pain syndrome in women

Chronic pelvic pain is pain in the area below your bellybutton and between your hips that lasts six months or longer.Chronic pelvic pain can have multiple causes. It can be a symptom of another disease, or it can be a condition in its own right.

If your chronic pelvic pain appears to be caused by another medical problem, treating that problem may be enough to eliminate your pain.However, in many cases it’s not possible to identify a single cause for chronic pelvic pain. In that case, the goal of treatment is to reduce your pain and other symptoms and improve your quality of life.

Symptoms

When asked to locate your pain, you might sweep your hand over your entire pelvic area rather than point to a single spot. You might describe your chronic pelvic pain in one or more of the following ways:

  • Severe and steady pain
  • Pain that comes and goes (intermittent)
  • Dull aching
  • Sharp pains or cramping
  • Pressure or heaviness deep within your pelvis

In addition, you may experience:

  • Pain during intercourse
  • Pain while having a bowel movement or urinating
  • Pain when you sit for long periods of time

Your discomfort may intensify after standing for long periods and may be relieved when you lie down. The pain may be mild and annoying, or it may be so severe that you miss work, can’t sleep and can’t exercise.

Pelvic pain syndrom in men

Men may have chronic pelvic pain from a number of disorders, including urinary dysfunction or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, prostatitis is the only male-specific cause of pelvic pain. While a bacterial infection is a common cause, in many cases the cause often remains unknown.

When a bacterial infection is not the cause, the condition is known by several names including chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), prostatodynia (painful prostate), and abacterial prostatitis.

What Are the Symptoms of Male Pelvic Pain?

Men with prostatitis may have any of the following pain symptoms:

  • pain or burning sensation when urinating (dysuria)
  • pain in the abdomen, groin, or lower back
  • pain in the area between the scrotum and rectum (perineum)
  • pain or discomfort in the penis or testicles
  • painful orgasms (ejaculations)
The pain or discomfort may be constant or it may come and go. Some men experience depression and a lower quality of life because of the pain.
Other symptoms associated with prostatitis include:
  • difficulty urinating, such as dribbling or hesitant urination
  • frequent urination, particularly at night (nocturia)
  • an urgent need to urinate
  • flu-like symptoms (with bacterial prostatitis

 

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This information is provided by Vascular Health Clinics and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider for advice about a specific medical condition.

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