May-Thurner Syndrome

May-Thurner Syndrome can be treated via a combination of medication and minimally invasive surgery to reduce symptoms and reduce the risk of further complications.

May-Thurner Syndrome Menu

What is May-Thurner syndrome?

The iliac arteries originate from the largest artery in the body, the abdominal aorta. They split at the spine to form the left and right iliac arteries, which feed blood to the pelvis and legs. The right iliac artery is supposed to lie over the left iliac vein, but with this syndrome this artery is compressing the vein. As a result of this compression, the iliac vein narrows and constricts, sometimes scarring. This narrowing results in increased risk of developing blood clots or deep vein thrombosis in that extremity.

Why do I have May-Thurner syndrome?

This condition is congenital but not hereditary and is more common in women than men. It shows up more frequently in young women taking birth control medication, as women age or as they gain weight. Many people may be unaware that they have this disorder, because many may only have some degree of compression of the iliac vein. Only a small number of individuals have severe compression of the iliac vein, resulting in symptoms, namely blood clots in the deep veins of the leg.

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This information is provided by Vascular Health Clinics and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider for advice about a specific medical condition.

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