Foot Surgery

Surgery on the foot, ankle, or lower leg is usually performed by podiatric surgeons. Foot and ankle surgeries address a wide variety of foot problems, including: Sprains and fractures. Arthritis and joint disease. Benign and malignant tumors. Birth deformities. Bunions. Calluses and warts. Corns and hammertoes. Flatfeet. Heel or toe spurs. Ingrown toenails. Neuromas (nerve tumors).

Call to request an appointment or to refer a patient:
989-254-6427
 

Flatfoot Correction

Adult acquired flatfoot or posterior tibial tendon dysfunction usually leads to a gradual loss of the arch. The posterior tibial muscle is a deep muscle in the back of the calf and has a long tendon that extends from above the ankle and attaches into several sites around the arch of the foot.

The muscle acts like a stirrup on the inside of the foot to help support the arch. The posterior tibial muscle stabilizes the arch and creates a rigid platform for walking and running. If the posterior tibial tendon becomes damaged or tears, the arch loses its stability and as a result, collapses, causing a flatfoot.

Possible complications from cyst removal surgery include infection, excessive swelling, and nerve damage.

Surgery is often performed to give the patient a more functional and stable foot. Several procedures may be required to correct a flatfoot deformity.

Surgical treatment can include the following kinds of procedures, depending on the severity of the problem:

  • Removal of inflammatory tissue and repair of the posterior tibial tendon.
  • Isolated bone fusion procedures, bone grafts, and/or repositioning bones through cuts called osteotomies.
  • Fusion procedures such as a triple or double arthrodesis, in which two or three major bones in the back of the foot are joined with screws or pins.

 


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